Faith based reentry training materials

A Guide for States, Faith Ba000001secondchancebutton-smaller_0sed and Community Organizations

Created by the Council of State Governments, this document is a practical guide for state government officials and representatives of faith-based and community organizations who want to create and sustain collaborative efforts to reduce recidivism and to help people returning home lead productive and law-abiding lives. Click here to receive their pdf document.

 

Reconciliation and Reentry Ministry

A faith based model by the Religious Coalition for a Non Violent Durham led by Marcia Owen, from Durham North Carolina. Click here to receive their training manual in pdf format.

 

Christian Association for Prison Aftercare (CAPA)

The Christian Association for Prison Aftercare (CAPA) advocates, inspires, encourages and educates those who bring good out of incarceration and its aftermath. CAPA has been established to provide prison aftercare professionals and volunteers with resources, training and encouragement, as they faithfully serve ex-prisoners and their families. CAPA is a professional association designed to serve and network its members, unite them under a shared vision, and train them for excellence in ministry. Through your membership you will receive invaluable information, encouragement and innovative ideas from fellow members to assist you in building a successful organization and ministry. Click here to access their website.

 

The Healing Community Guide – Compliments of the Annie E. Casey Foundation

The Healing Community guides help to engage congregations in the restoration and healing of members of their own congregation affected by crime, incarceration and reintegration. Building a Healing Community in your congregations can lead to the transformation of hearts and minds and the building of relationships that support people. The guides are not focused on creating a program but developing a ministry of formal and informal support, volunteer service, networking and advocacy – all drawing from the belief systems and unique strengths of the faith community — acceptance, compassion, forgiveness, redemption and restoration. Click here to receive the guide in pdf format.

 

Healing Communities–Balancing Justice With Mercy

Healing Communities offers a framework for faith communities that seeks to engage congregations in the restoration and healing of people in their own congregations affected by crime, incarceration and reintegration after prison or jail. Click here to access their PDF report.

 

The Family Freedom Kit:

“WHAT SHALL WE THEN DO?” is the question raised, in this 93 page pdf file, produced by the Progressive Nation Baptist Convention. This is an Interdenominational Guide and Kit for Creating Healing Communities. Click here to receive this PDF file.

 

Religion, Reform, Community: Examining the Idea of Church-based Prisoner Reentry

Click here for a link to the pdf file at urban.org discussing Church-based prisoner reentry.

 

The Center For Church and Prison

The Center for Church and Prison is a faith-based resource and research center working towards strategic solution development and intervention in the high rate of incarceration and recidivism especially evident among minority men. The Center for Church and Prison’s goal is to link the Church, individuals, organizations and the communities with the prison and prisoner by raising the need for more intentional intervention through program development and policies transformation. The Center for Church and Prison is not a prison ministry but we work towards enhancing prison ministries for maximum intervention. Click here to visit their home page.

 

The Religious Coalition for a Nonviolent Durham

The Religious Coalition for a Nonviolent Durham (RCND) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization comprised of individuals, who as an expression of their faith and goodwill, actively seek an end to the violence that is plaguing Durham neighborhoods. Click here to visit their website.

 

Jimmy Carter Calls Christians to Return to Jesus’ Moral Agenda on Prisoners

“I think of all the several facets describing Jesus in Luke 4 about his own moral agenda, the one we have neglected most, and violated most, is the release of the captives, that is prisoners,” he said. “We’re going backward, not forward” in terms of the prison issue in the United States. He lamented the nation’s “eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth” approach to punishment. “Unfortunately, led by some Christian leaders, our country has gone from a basic philosophy of rehabilitation of a prisoner to a punishment only – and the more severe and extended the punishment,” the better it is, he said. Click here to read this article published on ethicsdaily.com