Category: recidivism

Nov 29

“Stepping up” Initiative for Mental Health Taking Shape in Alamance County, NC

Mebane Enterprise By Adam Powell A large contingent of Alamance County elected officials, county employees, and local citizens made their way to San Antonio, Texas earlier this fall. The group received information about a diversionary program that could save the county time, money, and resources in dealing with mental health challenges among local residents. The …

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Nov 27

Mental Health Court Could Lower Recidivism, Cut Costs

Las Cruces Sun-News By Carlos Andres López Establishing a mental health court in Doña Ana County in New Mexico officials say, would help get into treatment people who commit crimes because of underlying mental health conditions. It could also reduce recidivism and cut incarceration costs. So-called mental health courts serve as jail-diversionary mechanisms and have been …

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Nov 13

End “Stovepipe Approach” to Public Safety, State Officials Told

The Crime Report By Ted Guest To many Americans, “criminal justice reform” means addressing two prominent challenges: reining in abusive police officers or cutting prison populations. This week, the Council of State Governments Justice Center and the Association of State Correctional Administrators brought teams from all 50 states to Washington, D.C., to underline the fact that reform means much …

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Nov 10

Prisoners Look to Life after Incarceration through Reentry Program

The Maroon By Andrew Callaghan Louisiana is the most incarcerated state in the most incarcerated country in the world. At 776 per 100,000 people incarcerated, Louisiana sits well ahead of the rest of the United States. Under the leadership of Democratic Gov. John Bel Edwards, the state legislature is trying to strip Louisiana of its …

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Nov 10

Reentry Simulation Shines Light on Recidivism in Delaware

WHYY By Shirley Min Elected leaders, police officers and members of the criminal justice community walked a mile in a newly-released prisoner’s shoes, during a reentry simulation at Delaware State University. The hour-long simulation was co-hosted by the Delaware House Democratic Caucus, the U.S. Attorney’s Office, District of Delaware and Delaware State University. Each week was …

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Oct 25

Raise the Age Summit Sheds Light on Michigan’s Tough Juvenile Justice Laws

WLNS By Alexandra Ilitch Michigan is one of five states that automatically allows 17 year-olds to be tried and sentenced as adults. An effort, called Raise The Age in Michigan is working to showcase some of the pitfalls of that system and details why it says 17 year-old offenders should be tried as minors. Being …

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Oct 24

Rep. Charles Graham to Participate in Crime Summit

The Robesonian By Robesonian Staff A state lawmaker from Lumberton has been selected to participate in a national summit to study crime and correctional systems. Rep. Charles Graham will take part in the 50-State Summit on Public Safety, which takes place Nov. 13 and Nov. 14 in Washington, D.C. Leaders from each of the 50 …

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Oct 12

Second Chance Act Grantee Receives National Criminal Justice Association Award

By CSG Justice Center Staff Accepting the award were (from left) Kelley Heifort, Community Reentry director, MN DOC; Lee Buckley, coordinator, Community Reentry, MN DOC; and Raeone Magnuson, executive director, Office of Justice Programs, MN Department of Public Safety. The Minnesota Department of Corrections (MN DOC) was one of five organizations in the country to …

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Oct 11

Forgiving and Forgetting in American Justice: A 50-State Guide to Expungement and Restoration of Rights

This report from the Collateral Consequences Resource Center catalogues and analyzes the various provisions for relief from the collateral consequences of conviction that are now operating in each state, including judicial record-sealing and certificates of relief, executive pardon, and administrative nondiscrimination statutes.  The report’s goal is to facilitate a national conversation about how those who have a …

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Oct 10

People Sentenced to Prison, Not Probation, Are More Likely to Reoffend, UC Berkeley Study Finds

The Daily Californian By Ella Colbert A study conducted by a UC Berkeley professor that was published Monday found that individuals sentenced to prison rather than probation were more likely to re-enter the prison system. David Harding, a UC Berkeley associate professor of sociology, said he worked on the study with his three co-authors for …

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