Category: Employment Roundup

Franklin County Program Helps Frequently Jailed Women Chart New Path

The Columbus Dispatch By Marc Kovac One half of Rachael Cook’s artwork was labeled Secrets. That’s the stuff that keeps the 26-year-old Linden-area woman hooked on drugs. The other half was labeled Depression, another of Cook’s struggles and one that often makes it difficult for her to forgive herself and move past her mistakes. There was a …

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Kentucky Looks at New Reforms to Cut Jail, Prison Population

The Sentinel Echo By The Sentinel Echo Staff Staying out of jail may be as easy as having a steady job for some former Kentucky inmates. Former inmates who stay employed for one year are about 35 percent less likely to return to jail than those who don’t work, Kentucky Justice and Public Safety Cabinet …

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Tender Justice: North Dakota Is Conducting a Prison Experiment Unlike Anything in the United States

Governing By David Kidd Terry Pullins is on his second tour in the North Dakota prison system. He’s also done time in California. Since he never got farther than the fifth grade, the 40-year-old Pullins has spent nearly as much time behind bars as he did in school. But last December brought the most acute …

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Best and Promising Practices in Integrating Reentry and Employment Interventions

Hosted by the National Reentry Resource Center with funding support from the U.S. Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Assistance Download a PDF of the presentation. Employment is an important aspect of successful reentry, however simply placing people returning home after incarceration in a job is not the ultimate solution to reducing recidivism or improving …

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License to Clip: A Movement to Let the Formerly Incarcerated Cut Hair and Drive Taxis Is Gaining Ground

The Marshall Project By Ashley Nerbovig Rosemarie Abruzzese feared losing her cosmetology license and her job in 2017 after the Pennsylvania Board of Cosmetology said her past felony drug conviction made her a threat to public safety. Her story is familiar, a license being threatened or denied outright because of a past crime. Abruzzese was …

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Opinion: Businesses Can’t Find People to Hire. So Why Is Unemployment Still so High for This Demographic?

NBC News THINK By Chandra Bozelko and Ryan Lo Despite a record 6.7 million open jobs in America and the fact that nearly one-third of small businesses cannot fill open jobs, the stigma against hiring formerly incarcerated people is so severe that more than 27 percent of us are unemployed, according to a study out …

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Workforce Advocates in Arizona Host First Ever Employer Reentry Forum

Chamber Business News By Ava Montoya Last week, Arizona Correctional Industries, ARIZONA@WORK, the Arizona Department of Corrections, the Arizona Department of Economic Security and the Arizona Commerce Authority collaboratively hosted the first Employer Reentry Forum. The forum brought correctional programs, employers and former inmates together to expose more of the state’s job creators to what …

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Second Chance Act Spotlight: Byron Davis, Birmingham, Alabama

By CSG Justice Center Staff Byron Davis used the end of his sentence in Limestone Correctional Facility near Huntsville, Alabama, to get ready for his next step: searching for work back home in his community, just outside of Birmingham. He intended to put his conviction for dealing drugs behind him. “I don’t want to go …

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Criminal Convictions behind Them, Few Have Had Their Records Sealed

The New York Times By Jan Ransom Carlos grew up in the Bedford-Stuyvesant section of Brooklyn in the 1990s, then a rough-and-tumble neighborhood where he struggled to stay out of trouble. He later moved with his wife and two children to the South Bronx, where he made a career as a taxi driver. But he …

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Training the Brain to Stay out of Jail

The Marshall Project By Eli Hager Growing up in public housing in North Charleston, S.C., in the 1970s, David Hayward was familiar with poverty, violence and loss. His mother, grandmother and brother all died when he was young, and his father was in prison. He became addicted to alcohol and cocaine and occasionally lived under …

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