Category: criminal records

Apr 18

How Cities Can Reduce Recidivism for Young Adults

CitiesSpeak By Emily Morgan, CSG Justice Center As jurisdictions work to increase public safety and reduce corrections costs, a growing number have been exploring strategies targeted at improving outcomes for what is often the most challenging population under justice system supervision: young adults, ages 18 to 24. Young adults need tailored responses to reduce the likelihood …

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Mar 29

Reentry Essentials: An Overview of Employment and Correctional Education

By CSG Justice Center Staff This is the first in a series of posts on aspects of successful reentry. Each post will include curated resources related to the featured reentry topic. Employment Can Improve Reentry Outcomes Employment is widely seen by reentry service providers, researchers, policymakers, and people who were previously incarcerated as crucial to …

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Feb 26

White House Highlights Criminal Justice Reform with Tuesday Governors’ Meeting

Washington Examiner By Kelly Cohen A bipartisan group of governors and business executives will visit the White House Tuesday for a discussion on hiring workers who have criminal records. Kentucky’s Republican Gov. Matt Bevin and Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, a Democrat, will be joined by executives from Uber, Home Depot, Koch Industries, Brown-Forman Corporation, John …

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Jan 20

How Tech Firms Are Embracing Ex-Prisoners

Fortune By Jennifer Alsever Richard Bronson made millions on Wall Street in the 1990s, but by 2005 he found himself destitute with no home and no money—and only his sister’s couch on which to sleep. No one would give him a job or even entertain the idea. “I tried to put the past behind me, …

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Jan 13

As Labor Pool Shrinks, Prison Time Is Less of a Hiring Hurdle

The New York Times By Ben Casselman A rapidly tightening labor market is forcing companies across the country to consider workers they once would have turned away. That is providing opportunities to people who have long faced barriers to employment, such as criminal records, disabilities or prolonged bouts of joblessness. In Dane County, Wis., where …

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Jan 02

At 18, Kingsley Rowe Went to Prison for 10 Years. Now He’s 47 and Still Wonders When He’ll Be Free

Salon By Rachel Leah “I’m formerly incarcerated,” and “I spent 10 years in prison for an accident,” Kingsley Rowe told Compass Charter School’s founders during his initial interview for a position there. Rowe was not inexperienced in presenting himself to potential employers, but this was one of the first times Rowe had ever disclosed his …

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Oct 26

After 20 Years, Still Haunted by a Drug Conviction

The Marshall Project By Jason Bost I love my daughter. That goes without saying for most parents, but I am truly crazy about mine. She literally came out of the womb with a smile on her face — no crying, just a big smile, shocking the doctor and all the nurses in the room. As …

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Aug 30

Nevada’s New Record-Sealing Law: “One of Broadest” in U.S.

The Crime Report By Suzanne Potter Nevada is the kind of place where a lot of people end up needing a second chance. It’s a state where the booms and busts of the gaming industry have led many into poverty, drug abuse, even jail time. So, as it slowly recovers from the 2008 recession, legislators …

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Aug 30

Improving Access to Career Pathways for Philadelphia’s Child Welfare and Juvenile Justice System Involved Youth

This report from the Juvenile Law Center takes a focused look at the barriers to career pathways that system-involved youth encounter. Based on an in-depth needs assessment of the Philadelphia community, the report offers five strategies to improve access to career-focused programs and early work experiences for youth in the child welfare or juvenile justice system, …

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Aug 25

Illinois Enacts Broadest Sealing Law in Nation

Collateral Consequences Resource Center  By CCRC Staff On Friday Illinois governor Bruce Rauner signed into law what appears to be the broadest sealing law in the United States, covering almost all felonies and requiring a relatively short eligibility waiting period of three years. We expect to provide a more in-depth discussion of the law next …

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