Category: criminal record clearance

Opinion: Businesses Can’t Find People to Hire. So Why Is Unemployment Still so High for This Demographic?

NBC News THINK By Chandra Bozelko and Ryan Lo Despite a record 6.7 million open jobs in America and the fact that nearly one-third of small businesses cannot fill open jobs, the stigma against hiring formerly incarcerated people is so severe that more than 27 percent of us are unemployed, according to a study out …

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Criminal Convictions behind Them, Few Have Had Their Records Sealed

The New York Times By Jan Ransom Carlos grew up in the Bedford-Stuyvesant section of Brooklyn in the 1990s, then a rough-and-tumble neighborhood where he struggled to stay out of trouble. He later moved with his wife and two children to the South Bronx, where he made a career as a taxi driver. But he …

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The Clean Slate Model–Sealing Criminal Records through Automated Computer Queries

Hosted by the Clean Slate Clearinghouse with funding support from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment and Training Administration and the U.S. Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Assistance Download a PDF of the presentation. This webinar explores the new “Clean Slate” model of mass sealing minor conviction and non-conviction records by automated computer queries, …

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Seeking New Perspective, Interview Series Gives Firsthand Look at Criminal Record Clearance Experiences

By Clair Sinclair, CSG Justice Center With awareness of the need for criminal justice reform on the rise across the country, hearing stories about people who have criminal records isn’t all that uncommon. But a new interview series is allowing listeners to actually hear how these records have impacted lives as well as the discourse …

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Forgiving and Forgetting in American Justice: A 50-State Guide to Expungement and Restoration of Rights

This report from the Collateral Consequences Resource Center catalogues and analyzes the various provisions for relief from the collateral consequences of conviction that are now operating in each state, including judicial record-sealing and certificates of relief, executive pardon, and administrative nondiscrimination statutes.  The report’s goal is to facilitate a national conversation about how those who have a …

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Five Things You Didn’t Know about Clearing Your Record

The Marshall Project By Christie Thompson A Nashville lawyer hopes to wipe clean some arrest records for 128,000 Tennesseans. The lawyer, Daniel Horwitz, who has worked on multiple cases regarding incarceration and re-entry, has filed a class-action motion in county court to have the case files destroyed for hundreds of thousands of arrests and charges that never …

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Nevada’s New Record-Sealing Law: “One of Broadest” in U.S.

The Crime Report By Suzanne Potter Nevada is the kind of place where a lot of people end up needing a second chance. It’s a state where the booms and busts of the gaming industry have led many into poverty, drug abuse, even jail time. So, as it slowly recovers from the 2008 recession, legislators …

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Illinois Enacts Broadest Sealing Law in Nation

Collateral Consequences Resource Center  By CCRC Staff On Friday Illinois governor Bruce Rauner signed into law what appears to be the broadest sealing law in the United States, covering almost all felonies and requiring a relatively short eligibility waiting period of three years. We expect to provide a more in-depth discussion of the law next …

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Get to Know the Expert: Q & A with Michael Pinard

By CSG Justice Center Staff The Clean Slate Clearinghouse  Advisory Board—which consists of legal and academic experts from around the country—works to make the Clean Slate Clearinghouse a mechanism to expand record clearance nationwide. The CSG Justice Center staff spoke with board member Michael Pinard—the Francis and Harriet Iglehart Professor of Law and  co-director of …

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Clean Slate Clearinghouse Advisory Board Member’s Advocacy Bolstered by Personal Experience in the Justice System

By CSG Justice Center Staff At 15 years old, Dina Sarver was adjudicated delinquent and served six months in a Florida residential facility. When she was released at 16, she earned her GED and went on to pursue her AA, but found that some of her educational opportunities—particularly a degree in nursing—were limited because of …

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