Category: collateral consequences

Opinion: Rehabilitation Through Spirituality and Faith—Why Isn’t the Prison and Reentry Reform Movement Focused on the Capacity Building of Responsive and Compelling Change Agents?

Berkley Forum By Caterina Roman and John K. Roman Since the origins of penitentiaries in Europe and America in the 1700s, individuals affiliated with religious institutions have been providing care and support for incarcerated and released prisoners. Fortunately, we have moved past the thinking of the original Quaker penal regimes which held that solitude and …

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Starting Today, Ex-Felons Can Sign up to Vote in Florida

South Florida Sun Sentinel By Skyler Swisher Floridians with felony convictions are now able to register to vote with a new constitutional amendment taking effect. About 64 percent of voters supported Amendment 4, which automatically restores voting rights to most people who have felonies on their record. South Florida election supervisors are gearing up to implement …

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New Web Tool Provides Look at Often-Overlooked Legal, Regulatory Restrictions Against People who have Criminal Convictions

By CSG Justice Center Staff Collateral consequences are penalties buried in various laws that can limit or prohibit people convicted of crimes from finding work, accessing housing, and otherwise impact their rights and benefits that can help them to rebuild their lives. The new National Inventory of Collateral Consequences of Conviction resource, launched today by …

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Repairing the Road to Redemption in California

Californians with convictions face over 4,800 laws that impose harmful collateral consequences long after successful completion of a sentence, most of which have no foundation in public safety and serve no purpose other than to make it harder for people to rebuild their lives. The barriers are extensive and block people from job opportunities, housing, education, …

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The Victims Who Don’t Count

The Marshall Project By Alysia Santo After his father was murdered in Sarasota, Florida, in 2015, Anthony “Amp” Campbell was in shock. Not only had he lost his role model and supporter, he also worried about coming up with $10,000 to pay for the funeral and burial. Campbell, an Alabama State University football coach, emptied …

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The Common App Will Stop Asking about Students’ Criminal Histories

The Atlantic By Alia Wong The nonprofit organization behind the Common Application, a single form that students can fill out to apply to any college that uses it, announced this week that, starting next year, it will no longer ask students about their criminal history. The shift could alter the life course for many students …

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Criminal Convictions behind Them, Few Have Had Their Records Sealed

The New York Times By Jan Ransom Carlos grew up in the Bedford-Stuyvesant section of Brooklyn in the 1990s, then a rough-and-tumble neighborhood where he struggled to stay out of trouble. He later moved with his wife and two children to the South Bronx, where he made a career as a taxi driver. But he …

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Apply Now: State System Enhancements for Youth Offenders Program

The U.S. Department of Justice’s Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention is seeking applications for its FY 2018 State System Enhancements for Youth Offenders Program. This grant supports states and localities in developing and implementing strategies to ensure that youth involved with the juvenile justice system have fair and equal access to quality legal representation; ensure that youth involved with the …

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TED Talk

The United States locks up more people than any other country in the world, says documentarian Eve Abrams, and somewhere between 1 and 4 percent of them are likely innocent. That’s 87,000 brothers, sisters, mothers and fathers separated from their families, their lives and dreams put on hold. Using audio from interviews with these families, …

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At 18, Kingsley Rowe Went to Prison for 10 Years. Now He’s 47 and Still Wonders When He’ll Be Free

Salon By Rachel Leah “I’m formerly incarcerated,” and “I spent 10 years in prison for an accident,” Kingsley Rowe told Compass Charter School’s founders during his initial interview for a position there. Rowe was not inexperienced in presenting himself to potential employers, but this was one of the first times Rowe had ever disclosed his …

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