Category: collateral consequences

Oct 11

Forgiving and Forgetting in American Justice: A 50-State Guide to Expungement and Restoration of Rights

This report from the Collateral Consequences Resource Center catalogues and analyzes the various provisions for relief from the collateral consequences of conviction that are now operating in each state, including judicial record-sealing and certificates of relief, executive pardon, and administrative nondiscrimination statutes.  The report’s goal is to facilitate a national conversation about how those who have a …

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Aug 30

Improving Access to Career Pathways for Philadelphia’s Child Welfare and Juvenile Justice System Involved Youth

This report from the Juvenile Law Center takes a focused look at the barriers to career pathways that system-involved youth encounter. Based on an in-depth needs assessment of the Philadelphia community, the report offers five strategies to improve access to career-focused programs and early work experiences for youth in the child welfare or juvenile justice system, …

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Jul 20

Register for Webinar: Putting People at the Center—The Role of Lived Experience in Dismantling Collateral Consequences Caused by Incarceration

Hosted by the Heartland Alliance The goal of this webinar will be to acknowledge that policy and systems change is most authentic and impactful when it surfaces and is driven from lived experience. This webinar will explore the ways in which organizations partner with and learn from people most impacted in their decision making and …

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Jun 14

North Dakota’s Justice Reinvestment Approach: Investing in Community-Based Behavioral Health Services Instead of Prisons

In North Dakota, a justice reinvestment approach resulted in sweeping changes to improve community-based treatment for people in the criminal justice system and to increase the number of treatment providers to serve this population. The state will also prioritize prison bed space for people convicted of the most serious offenses by utilizing probation and limiting …

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